Follow Dave Linkedin
Email Dave Email
Human Resources
Nov 15, 2015

Managers Are The Problem With Performance Appraisals

Sponsored Content provided by Dave Hoff - Chief Operating Officer and Executive VP of Leadership Development, EASI Consult

As the days become cooler and darkness comes earlier, you can see the end of another calendar year. When I was inside a Fortune 100 company, this also meant fall planning sessions, annual budgets (including salaries), and performance appraisals.
 
I peruse a variety of publications to stay in touch with topics that seem to be of interest. One of the articles I saw in the October 2015 issue of HR Magazine was entitled, Is the Annual Performance Review Dead? One of the highlights of the article is that on a five-point appraisal scale, the average rating for an employee is 3.3. The article also explained why General Electric ditched performance reviews earlier this year.
 
Talking about reviews in general, 95 percent of managers are dissatisfied with their performance reviews system (this is not new news), 59 percent of employees say performance reviews are not worth the time invested, and 56 percent of employees say they do not receive feedback on what to improve.
 
The second article I saw on this topic was in Government Executive. The Oct. 15 column by Dannielle Blumenthal is titled, How Well Are Bosses Bossing?” She talks about performance reviews from different perspectives. She says good reviews help you and bad reviews don’t do much for your career. You as an employee want recognition, respect and to be valued. It’s not clear what motivates the boss, maybe professional development. The boss rates you but is not typically rated herself. She may be totally incompetent, but what’s your point? Lastly, Blumenthal is not clear that performance reviews have any impact on productivity. She suggests six pulse surveys a year in which bosses rate employees and vice versa. These events roll up into an annual review that becomes a non-event.
 
Here is my two cents. Companies need a means to give people feedback on their performance. If you don’t formalize it (performance appraisal system) it doesn’t happen. When an individual contributor accepts an offer to supervise other employees, in addition to receiving more money, a title and a bigger office, he or she should sign a promise to demonstrate managerial courage. This says the employee acknowledges that giving positive and constructive feedback is part of the job.
 
Bosses should be rated on this aspect of management. What will make this conversation easier is if the system has three rating possibilities: meets expectations, exceeds expectations, or below expectations. Most of the people are doing what you asked them to do and should receive a “meets” rating. You have a few stars and you need to tell them so, and you have a few folks who need to improve their performance or go elsewhere, and you need to tell them.
 
In my opinion, appraisals for bosses should cover three areas. The first is accountability and managerial courage.
 
The second is about communication, clarity and productivity. I do believe that the high-level goals of an organization need to flow down, and that each individual needs to understand how his or her efforts support the organization’s goals. If each individual achieves his or her specific objectives, then those efforts should improve the organization’s productivity. I have seen how a tight link from top to bottom translates into amazing results. The difficult piece involves communication. To the degree that the message sent is received, understood, communicated up and the cycle continues, then we have clarity.
 
The third area is about investing in the future. It involves feedback to the employee (positive and constructive) and then preparing people to do better in their current jobs or for future roles. Feedback is a lost art in many organizations. Employees come to work for you and your organization more than 200 days a year, and you owe them feedback. Feedback gives them assistance to be better tomorrow. I am one who believes that brief conversations once a week or month are better than talking only once a year.
 
In summary, I am in favor of performance reviews as long as you keep them simple and include:

  1. Accountability and managerial courage
     
  2. Communication and clarity
     
  3. Feedback and development
EASI•Consult® works with Fortune 500 companies, government agencies, and mid-sized corporations to provide customized Talent Management solutions. EASI Consult’s specialties include individual assessment, online employment testing, survey research, competency modeling, leadership development, executive coaching, 360-degree feedback, online structured interviews, and EEO hiring compliance. The company is a leader in the field of providing accurate information about people through professional assessment. To learn more about EASI Consult, visit www.easiconsult.com, email
[email protected] or call 800.922.EASI.
 

Other Posts from Dave Hoff

Block ad easi 121411839
Ico insights

INSIGHTS

SPONSORS' CONTENT
Carolinemontgomery4

Business Owner Frustrations

Caroline Montgomery - Adam Shay CPA, PLLC
Sherrip2019 insights profile

That’s Who We Are

Sherri Pridgen - Cape Fear REALTORS®
Img 1576c1

Are Growth Stock Valuations Underpinned by Reality?

Eddie Nowell - South Atlantic Capital Management Group

Trending News

KWIPPED Receives $1.3M Investment

Johanna Cano - Jul 19, 2019

MSD Adds New Position As Hospitality Focus Grows

Christina Haley O'Neal - Jul 19, 2019

Building UNCW's Future

Jenny Callison - Jul 19, 2019

Report: Airbnb, Hotels Don't Exactly Compete

Sherri Crawford - Jul 19, 2019

From Catering To Dining In

Casey Mcanarney - Jul 19, 2019

In The Current Issue

Hammering For More Of The Market

A Wilmington-based hammer manufacturer is making more than 580 different varieties of one of the world’s simplest tools....


More Zones, More Housing Options

For at least one potential apartment project, things might have been different if New Hanover County’s new zoning districts had already been...


From Catering To Dining In

A local couple's new restaurant, Savor Southern Kitchen, is expanding of their catering company's success....

Book On Business

The 2019 WilmingtonBiz: Book on Business is an annual publication showcasing the Wilmington region as a center of business.

Order Your Copy Today!


Galleries

Videos

Power Breakfast - The H Word (June 13, 2019)
2019 WilmingtonBiz Expo Keynote Lunch - CEO, nCino, Pierre Naude`
Health Care Heroes 2018