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At Wrightsville Beach, Crews Straighten Out Social Club's Sideward Snag

By Cece Nunn, posted Feb 2, 2024
The Commodore Club, shown after crews fixed a faulty bracket, is a floating social club and restaurant complex at Wrightsville Beach Marina. (Photo courtesy of Monteith Construction)

The Commodore Club, a floating social club and restaurant complex recently moved from the Cape Fear River to Wrightsville Beach Marina, became somewhat of a social media sensation this week.

A photo posted by Ed Byrd (shown at right) on the public Facebook page Friends of Wrightsville Beach shows the club tilted to one side in its home at the marina. But the temporary glitch that occurred Tuesday has been straightened out, said Bryan Thomas, president of Monteith Construction, the company building the Commodore Club.

“It was just a construction bracket failure,” Thomas said Friday. “We typically have things that happen during the day on construction sites that we have to adapt to; it’s just typically not in the Intracoastal Waterway front and center at Wrightsville Beach. We admit it didn’t look great, but it was a controlled plan to repair a faulty bracket.”

Simply put, a system of brackets holds the Commodore Club's barge in place. Instead of immediately cutting the faulty bracket, Thomas said, those working on the project decided to let the tide drop and then wait for it to come back up.

Thomas said the faulty bracket didn’t damage the $9 million facility.

"We didn’t even have any cracks in the drywall," he said.

When the club was on its way down the river to the marina last week, Thomas said, “We’ve got about 60 to 70 days of additional work to do on the inside – mainly finishes, flooring, final painting, glass handrails, wood stairs, things like that.”

The club, which will also have a public restaurant component, had just under 400 members as of Jan. 23.

 

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