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Port City Produce Rebrands, Prepares To Move To New Market St. Location

By Jessica Maurer, posted Oct 27, 2020
This weekend marks the end of Port City Produce’s 11th season at 5740 Market St., and owners Sven Wallin, Andrew Cameron and Wells Struble are preparing for the move to their new location just down the road.

Wallin said the owners were notified at the end of last year’s season that the land which they had been renting for over a decade was for sale.

“We had actually outgrown that space and so we were looking to grow anyway,” Sven Wallin said.

Wallin developed the business plan for Port City Produce as part of his graduation requirements for an Entrepreneurship in Management program at Appalachian State University and launched the market shortly after graduation. Port City Produce opened its second location at 6458 Carolina Beach Road just one year later.

Now, the market will have a new location as well as a new name, Biggers Market, taken from Wallin’s mother’s maiden name. His maternal grandfather and great-uncles started a produce company in Charlotte many years ago, and Wallin said he thought it would be cool to incorporate the family name into his business as well.

While the Market Street location will be moving to a facility now under construction at 6250 Market St., the Carolina Beach Road location will remain unchanged.

Local contractors, Atlantic Barn & Timber Co. and Advent Building are currently putting the finishing touches on the space, which like the previous market is an open-air space, but is about twice the size.

In addition to the market itself, it will have a large production area with refrigeration and a space that could potentially house a kitchen.

Like many businesses currently under construction, the timeline for completion has been pushed back due to COVID-19.

“We had originally hoped it would be completed by August,” Wallin said, “But now it’s looking like maybe mid-November.”

Port City Produce usually starts carrying Christmas Trees around Thanksgiving, so whether or not they will be able to sell them this year is dependent upon completion of the building.

Wallin said that if they’re not able to open in time to carry trees, they will open for the spring season in March.

Wallin and his partners are excited that the new location borders the Long Leaf Acres neighborhood and residents will be able walk or bike to the market.

In addition to a wide variety of seasonal produce, the market will offer locally prepared condiments, jams and sauces. Wallin hopes to eventually also offer cut fruits and veggies and some prepared meals.

They are also exploring the idea of selling ice cream, beer and wine.

The market will continue to offer online ordering for curbside pickup next season and are also exploring delivery options.

“Most people still like to come out for the experience,” Wallin said. “And the new location will offer an even better one.”

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